Counting Our Veggies

Please join us as we focus on learning about and trying one vegetable each week.


2 Comments

Week Four: Roasted Radish, Pepper and Carrot

Radish week is coming to a close. Our final recipe is Roasted Radish, Pepper and Carrot that we found at Sarah’s Cucina Bella. This recipe uses the daikon type of radish that we made into radish cakes a few days ago. I had high hopes for this recipe, since I liked the radish cakes and like all the other veggies in this recipe. The idea of roasting them sounded appealing, as well as the idea of adding balsamic vinegar.

First we gathered our veggies.

Veggies for Roasting

The recipe calls for specific amounts daikon radish, carrot, red bell pepper and shallot. We just chopped up what we had without measuring and used an onion instead of a shallot, because that is all we had.

Pan of Veggies

I think Lucie is too young to use a sharp knife, but she was still interested in learning about what I was doing and had fun stealing a few peppers and carrots to munch on while I cut the veggies for roasting.

Veggie Stealer

We drizzled the veggies with olive oil, added salt and pepper and put them in the oven at 400 degrees for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, we drizzled them with a bit of balsamic vinegar and put them back in the oven for about ten more minutes.

Radish_103

The veggies looked good and smelled good at this point. I could not wait to taste them and neither could Lucie and Dave.

Tasting Daikon Radish

The verdict…

Two Thumbs Down for Roasted Radish

Two thumbs down! I had to agree with her. I thought the rest of the veggies tasted fine, but the radish was just not for me. I’m not quite sure how to describe it, but I really did not like it. Josie and Theo are smart kids. They watch Lucie very closely and they trust her judgement. They were not going near these radishes.

Dave, on the other hand, LOVED these roasted veggies, especially the roasted daikon radishes. He ate them with a baked chicken breast and had a second serving of veggies. He says he would gladly eat this dish again.

Radish_102

Overall, I feel that we learned a lot during radish week. I had never even heard of a daikon radish before last Sunday and I ended up using them twice this week. I thought that learning about tillage radishes and the Night of the Radishes festival was interesting. I was proud of how excited Lucie was about incorporating the veggies into a math lesson. (Lucie’s radish calculations were Dave’s favorite part of our blog so far.) I also felt that the kids were very interested in what we were doing in the kitchen and enjoyed being involved in preparing and tasting our recipes. What was your favorite part of radish week? We would love to hear from you!

Thanks for visiting,

Jen

P.S.

A few words from Lucie:

We tried a cooked daikon radish recipe. I thought it looked like a veggie salad before we put it in the oven. I gave it two thumbs down. I did not like it. I really liked radish week because I like the spicy taste of radishes. In fact, I just ate a bowl of crunchy, red radishes with salt and butter.


6 Comments

Week Four: Baked Radish Chips

While Lucie and I were researching radishes online, we came across an article about a festival in Oaxaca, Mexico called “The Night of Radishes”. This festival is held each year on December 23 and features art carved from locally grown radishes. You can read more about it in this article from the Vancouver Observer.

Lucie and I decided to try our own radish art. We saw this idea at Shades of Tangerine.

Radish

Carving Radish

Radish Mushroom

The kids all thought this was a fantastic thing to do. They now have big plans to carve an entire enchanted fairy garden from vegetables. I think we will save that project for later…

In addition to making radish art, we tried making two different kinds of radish chips. The first was plain baked radish chips with salt. We found this recipe on food.com.

First we sliced the radishes. We just used a knife, but they may have been a more consistent thickness if we had used some kind of vegetable slicing device.

Sliced Radishes

Next, we added one tablespoon of peanut oil and tossed the slices around to coat them. I’m sure any other kind of oil would be fine.

The girls were excited to help with the next step and had fun lining them up on the baking sheet.

Radish Helpers

We sprinked them with salt and baked them at 375 degrees for about 8 minutes. Then we flipped each little radish slice over and baked them for another 8 minutes. We may have overcooked them, but we found that we liked the crispy ones the best.

Radish Chips

These were eaten in less than one and a half minutes. And they only took about 30 minutes of slicing, arranging, flipping and salting to make. We need to find a way to automate this process.

Seriously, look at this reaction from Josie:

Josie Tasting Radish Chips

She was smiling as she tasted a radish! We got a triple two thumbs up rating for this one!

Radish Chips Theo Two Thumbs Up

Radish Chips Josie Two Thumbs Up

Radish Chips Lucie Two Thumbs Up

We will definitely be making baked radish chips again soon.

We also tried a cinnamon, sugar and honey variety of baked radish ships from Pinch of Yum

This variation was a little trickier to bake. They went from soggy to overdone in the blink of an eye.

Radish Chips Cinnamon

The girls did not like this kind of radish chips, but Theo and I gobbled them up.

Theo Tasting Radish Chips

I thought they tasted kind of like really burnt marshmallow for s’mores, which I love, but I would probably skip this variety in the future.

Thanks for visiting,

Jen

P.S.

A few words from Lucie:

We made radish chips and they were a lot of work. Josie and I helped Mama lay the radishes out on the tray. I like one kind of radish chips, but I did not like the other.

I think the radish festival and carving contest in Mexico is cool. I would like to visit the radish festival someday. I like the mushroom radish that we made. Vegetables can be more than tasty. They can also be fun!